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He helped helm the Watch The Throne mega-hit “N*ggas in Paris,” but Hit-Boy’s relationship with Kanye West hasn’t been as successful as the single.

The pair were once close associates, personally and professionally, but earlier this week, Hit-Boy shared on Instagram that he kicked Kanye to the curb after a conversation her had with the rapper years ago.

According to the producer, West told him that he “stopped picking my beats because I worked with Beyonce.”

In a sit down with GQ, Hit-Boy explained why he decided to publicly share the information about his division with Ye.

“Obviously he always goes on these sporadic rants, but some of that stuff was resonating with me,” said the producer. “A lot of people on Twitter were like, ‘Why even throw the Beyonce sh*t in there?’ I’m going to tell you why. He on Twitter preaching, ‘I love all my brothers and we need to stick together and all this sh*t.’ But I feel like [Kanye] put me in a position where I was battling the ‘system’ and I was battling with my brothers. Because it would be different if Kanye was like, ‘Your sh*t wack now, I’m not using you.’ But n*gga, you telling me because you saw me working with somebody else that you’re not going to pick my beats?”

Hit-Boy added that while he was with GOOD Music, he worked with plenty of other artists aside from Beyoncé, but it didn’t seem to be a problem.

He added that he didn’t know why Bey seemed to be a trigger for West.

“I worked with so many artists and I never heard anything until I locked in with her,” said Hit-Boy. “So that just kind of rubbed me the wrong way. And I had to bury those emotions for years. The way he was speaking just sparked me to tell my side. This is how I feel. Like I’m fighting, to me, two oppressors: Corporations and somebody that is supposed to be a true mentor to somebody like me.”

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I haven’t been a fan of Kanye on a personal/ human level since he told me face to face he stopped picking my beats because I worked with Beyoncé. this is after I produced niggas in paris , clique, and a myriad of other songs / projects for him and his label GOOD Music in the 2 years I was signed with them. This tweet is something I can agree with though. @umpg has held me in what the last 3 lawyers Ive hired have referred to as the “worst publishing contact they’ve ever seen” since I was 19 years old. Im 33 now and have multiple Grammys, produced a lot of your favorite artists biggest songs on top of turning in over 450+ records since I first signed and @umpg still doesnt have it in them to simply be fair. If they’re doing this to me with all I’ve accomplished through hard work I can only imagine the kids who don’t have big placements/ proper guidance. If I have to be the one to get blackballed for telling the truth and trying to set the next generation free then so be it. Btw I produced 10+ joints on the CURRENT number one album in the country D2. @umpg @polowdadon @jodyagerson @iamwalterjones and the company who’s helping me on the management side @rocnation let’s fix this. Slave deals are still very real /rampant in 2020. @universalmusicgroup

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